Sunday, May 17, 2009

May. 17. Kimberly Williams. Rain. It seems that the Catawba want to fully initiate us with a grand display of the water cycle. Our adventure began with stormy skies and some nourishing rain. There
s plentry of water to keep us flowing into Charleston! Anyways, today was a good and rather relaxed second day. We got on the river/lake about 10:30 and paddled about 4 miles until lunch and class, which today was held on a dock. As we sat looking out at what we learned used to be a much narrower and free flowing river, much like the one we went to see at the headwaters in Linville,, Robert read a few articles about the stae of the river. On the bank wated tons of trash all around...a recurring issue here it seems. After our little class meeting we hopped back in out kayaks and arrived at our camp for the night. A small group of use along with Robert went to check out the Rhodhiss Dam that we will be portaging tomorrow could have been in a third world country, with its decrepit masonry. The dam was huge and a real eye-opener to why the river is now a lake and where the power for the area comes from. We just now finished eating dinner. No matter how new of a group we are the days come in a predictable fashion. With paddling, food, and laughter as the constants. If I listen close enough I can hear shuffling of setting camp, conversation, rain drops and the sound of the sea waiting for us...

8 comments:

  1. I do have to point out that the Rhodhiss dam is a very old dam that nevertheless has served well for a long time. It kind of hurts my feelings for you to call it decrepit and third-world. According to Duke Power, it was built in 1925 and has a capacity of 26 megawatts of energy. Actually, it's fairly common for damns in this area of the country. All over Caldwell county there are a number of small damns, some hydroelectric and some not, that are about as old, and in varying states of repair.

    More relevant may be the fact that on the left bank of the river (looking downstream from the dam) was a textile mill that burned down a number of years ago. There were rumors of arson, but the interesting point is that the mill still had a number of chemicals in it when it burned down. Firefighters had to pull their men and fire trucks over a thousand feet away because of the heat from the blaze.

    Another aside, slightly upstream from where you are now is the town of Rutherford College, the site of Rutherford College, one of the two colleges that contributed to the formation of Brevard College.

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  2. Kim- You wrote a beautiful blog-- with your magical words. Thank you.

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  3. SourPuss/ChameleonMay 18, 2009 at 1:24 AM

    Sounds like the beautiful godess from the beach is off to a great start on an amazing adventure. Enjoy the ride, knowledge and wisdom you will acquire as your journey progresses. Miss you - Come home to Florida's sunny beaches soon.

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  4. Thanks for the detailed visuals! Can't wait to read more! Hope that you all continue on safely.

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  5. Wow Kim, look at you weaving scenery with words. I can imagine it, I wish I could see it with yall. Carrilea and I are planning to come to the WWC on Thursday, see you then!

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  6. It sounds like the rainy day presnted you with many things to comtemplate... You were missed at Portuguese dinner, Kim. You are in my thoughts and I know you are going to be such a blessing to your group; Keep shining through the rain, lady : )

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  7. Pura Vida Kim!
    From I can immagine the adventure from here. Much love from Tres Rios!
    Scott

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